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The analysis of any legal or medical billing is dependent on numerous specific facts — including the factual situations present related to the patients, the practice, the professionals and the medical services and advice. Additionally, laws and regulations and insurance and payer policies are subject to change. The information that has been accurate previously can be particularly dependent on changes in time or circumstances. The information contained in this web site is intended as general information only. It is not intended to serve as medical, health, legal or financial advice or as a substitute for professional advice of a medical coding professional, healthcare consultant, physician or medical professional, legal counsel, accountant or financial advisor. If you have a question about a specific matter, you should contact a professional advisor directly. CPT copyright American Medical Association. All rights reserved. CPT is a registered trademark of the American Medical Association.

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Michigan Physical Therapy Professional Identification

Individual Identification

As a physical therapist who has earned a DPT degree, can I present myself to clients or the general public as "Dr."?

You are entitled to use any title, letters or phrases granted to you by an educational institution for the purpose of identifying yourself as having completed a specific level of training. If you use Dr., you must also include the terms physical therapy so it is clear you are a doctor of physical therapy. DPT is not a recognized title or initial for a licensee. The Board recommends that you use the term PT after your name to indicate that you hold a license to practice. You can then list educational degrees after PT.

What is the difference in the quality of physical therapy offered by a therapist who uses the letters: DPT, LPT, MPT, PTA, RPT or just PT?

The Public Health Code indicates that a physical therapist is entitled to use the following initials to indicate that they are licensed: PT, RPT, LPT, and PTT. Some of these initials represent titles or terms from the past such as RPT and PTT, which are rarely used now. The terms DPT and MPT refer to a degree awarded by an authorized educational institution. PTA refers to a physical therapy assistant who is not regulated but who operates under the delegation of a licensed physical therapist. The Board recommends that you use the term PT after your name to indicate that you hold a license to practice. You can then list educational degrees after PT.

For example:

Joan Smith, PT, MA

John Jones, PT, PhD

Sam Striker, PT, DPT

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