Upcoming Webinars 

Disclaimer

The analysis of any legal or medical billing is dependent on numerous specific facts — including the factual situations present related to the patients, the practice, the professionals and the medical services and advice. Additionally, laws and regulations and insurance and payer policies are subject to change. The information that has been accurate previously can be particularly dependent on changes in time or circumstances. The information contained in this web site is intended as general information only. It is not intended to serve as medical, health, legal or financial advice or as a substitute for professional advice of a medical coding professional, healthcare consultant, physician or medical professional, legal counsel, accountant or financial advisor. If you have a question about a specific matter, you should contact a professional advisor directly. CPT copyright American Medical Association. All rights reserved. CPT is a registered trademark of the American Medical Association.

Menu
Log in


Log in

Occupational Therapy 50 State Scope of Practice 

Alabama

The practice of occupational therapy means the therapeutic use of occupations, including everyday life activities with individuals, groups, populations, or organizations to support participation, performance, and function in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for habilitation, rehabilitation, and the promotion of health and wellness to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory-perceptual, and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts and environments to support engagement in occupations that affect physical and mental health, well-being, and quality of life. The practice of occupational therapy includes:

Evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation including all of the following:

    • Client factors, including body functions, such as neuromusculoskeletal, sensoryperceptual, visual, mental, cognitive, and pain factors; body structures such as cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, integumentary, genitourinary systems, and structures related to movement; values, beliefs, and spirituality.
    • Habits, routines, roles, rituals, and behavior patterns.
    • Physical and social environments, cultural, personal, temporal, and virtual contexts, and activity demands that affect performance.
    • Performance skills, including motor and praxis, sensory-perceptual, emotional regulation, cognitive, communication, and social skills.

Methods or approaches selected to direct the process of interventions such as:

    • Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed, is impaired, or is in decline.
    • Compensation, modification, or adaptation of activity or environment to enhance performance, or to prevent injuries, disorders, or other conditions.
    • Retention and enhancement of skills or abilities without which performance in everyday life activities would decline
    • Promotion of health and wellness, including the use of self-management strategies, to enable or enhance performance in everyday life activities.
    • Prevention of barriers to performance and participation, including injury and disability prevention.

Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation including all of the following:

    • Therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities.
    • Training in self-care, self-management, health management and maintenance, home management, community/work reintegration, and school activities and work performance.
    • Development, remediation, or compensation of neuromusculoskeletal, sensory-perceptual, visual, mental, and cognitive functions, pain tolerance and management, and behavioral skills.
    • Therapeutic use of self, including one's personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process.
    • Education and training of individuals, including family members, caregivers, groups, populations, and others.
    • Care coordination, case management, and transition services.
    • Consultative services to groups, programs, organizations, or communities.
    • Modification of environments, including home, work, school, or community, and adaptation of processes, including the application of ergonomic principles.
    • Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in seating and positioning, assistive technology, adaptive devices, training in the use of prosthetic devices, orthotic devices, and the design, fabrication and application of selected splints or orthotics.
    • Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including management of wheelchairs and other mobility devices.
    • Low vision rehabilitation when the patient or client is referred by a licensed optometrist, a licensed ophthalmologist, a licensed physician, a licensed assistant to physician acting pursuant to a valid supervisory agreement, or a licensed certified registered nurse practitioner in a collaborative practice agreement with a licensed physician.
    • Driver rehabilitation and community mobility.
    • Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance.
    • Application of physical agent modalities, and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures such as wound care management, interventions to enhance sensory-perceptual and cognitive processing, and manual therapy, all to enhance performance skills.
    • Facilitating the occupational performance of groups, populations, or organizations through the modification of environments and the adaptation of processes.

Ala. Code §34-39-3

Alaska

“Occupational therapy” means, for compensation, the use of purposeful activity, evaluation, treatment, and consultation with human beings whose ability to cope with the tasks of daily living are threatened with, or impaired by developmental deficits, learning disabilities, aging, poverty, cultural differences, physical injury or illness, or psychological and social disabilities to maximize independence, prevent disability, and maintain health.

Occupational therapy includes:

    • Developing daily living, play, leisure, social, and developmental skills;
    • Facilitating perceptual-motor and sensory integrative functioning;
    • Enhancing functional performance, prevocational skills, and work capabilities using specifically designed exercises, therapeutic activities and measure, manual intervention, and appliances;
    • Design, fabrication, and application of splints or selective adaptive equipment;
    • Administering and interpreting standardized and nonstandardized assessments, including sensory, manual muscle, and range of motion assessments, necessary for planning effective treatment; and
    • Adapting environments for the disabled.

Alaska Stat. 08.84.190

Arizona

Occupational therapy" means the use of therapeutic activities or modalities to promote engagement in activities with individuals who are limited by physical or cognitive injury or illness, psychosocial dysfunction, developmental or learning disabilities, sensory processing or modulation deficits or the aging process in order to achieve optimum functional performance, maximize independence, prevent disability and maintain health. Occupational therapy includes evaluation, treatment and consultation based on the client's temporal, spiritual and cultural values and needs.

"Occupational therapy services" includes the following:

    • Developing an intervention and training plan that is based on the occupational therapist's evaluation of the client's occupational history and experiences, including the client's daily living activities, development, activity demands, values and needs.
    • Evaluating and facilitating developmental, perceptual-motor, communication, neuromuscular and sensory processing function, psychosocial skills and systemic functioning, including wound, lymphatic and cardiac functioning.
    • Enhancing functional achievement, prevocational skills and work capabilities through the use of therapeutic activities and modalities that are based on anatomy, physiology and kinesiology, growth and development, disabilities, technology and analysis of human behavioral and occupational performance.
    • Evaluating, designing, fabricating and training the individual in the use of selective orthotics, prosthetics, adaptive devices, assistive technology and durable medical equipment as appropriate.
    • Administering and interpreting standardized and nonstandardized tests that are performed within the practice of occupational therapy, including manual muscle, sensory processing, range of motion, cognition, developmental and psychosocial tests.
    • Assessing and adapting environments for individuals with disabilities or who are at risk for dysfunction.

A.R.S. § 32-3401

Arkansas

"Occupational therapy" means the evaluation and treatment of individuals whose ability to cope with the tasks of living is threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, poverty or cultural differences, environmental or sensory deprivation, physical injury or illness, or psychological and social disability.

The treatment utilizes task-oriented activities to prevent or correct physical or emotional deficits or to minimize the disabling effect of these deficits in the life of the individual so that he or she might perform tasks normally performed at his or her stage of development.

Specific occupational therapy techniques include, but are not limited to:

    • Instruction in activities of daily living, design, fabrication, application, recommendation, and instruction in the use of selected orthotic or prosthetic devices and other adaptive equipment;
    • Perceptual-motor and sensory integrative activities;
    • The use of specifically designed crafts;
    • Exercises to enhance functional performance; and
    • Prevocational evaluation and treatment.

The techniques are applied in the treatment of individual patients or clients, in groups, or through social systems.

Ark. Code 17-88-102

California

“Occupational therapy” means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful goal-directed activities (occupations) with individuals, groups, populations, or organizations, to support participation, performance, and function in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for habilitation, rehabilitation, and the promotion of health and wellness for clients with disability- and nondisability-related needs or to those who have, or are at risk of developing, health conditions that limit activity or cause participation restrictions. Occupational therapy services encompass occupational therapy assessment, treatment, education, and consultation. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory-perception and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts and environments to support engagement in occupations that affect physical and mental health, well-being, and quality of life. Occupational therapy assessment identifies performance abilities and limitations that are necessary for self-maintenance, learning, work, and other similar meaningful activities.

Occupational therapy treatment is focused on developing, improving, or restoring functional daily living skills, compensating for and preventing dysfunction, or minimizing disability. Through engagement in everyday activities, occupational therapy promotes mental health by supporting occupational performance in people with, or at risk of experiencing, a range of physical and mental health disorders. Occupational therapy techniques that are used for treatment involve teaching activities of daily living (excluding speech-language skills); designing or fabricating orthotic devices, and applying or training in the use of assistive technology or orthotic and prosthetic devices (excluding gait training). Occupational therapy consultation provides expert advice to enhance function and quality of life. Consultation or treatment may involve modification of tasks or environments to allow an individual to achieve maximum independence. Services are provided individually, in groups, or populations.

Cal. Bus. and Prof. Code § 2570.2

Colorado

"Occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of everyday life activities with individuals or groups for the purpose of participation in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. The practice of occupational therapy includes:

Methods or strategies selected to direct the process of interventions such as:

    • Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed or is impaired;
    • Compensation, modification, or adaptation of an activity or environment to enhance performance;
    • Maintenance and enhancement of capabilities without which performance of everyday life activities would decline;
    • Promotion of health and wellness to enable or enhance performance in everyday life activities; and
    • Prevention of barriers to performance, including disability prevention.

Evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

    • Client factors, including body functions such as neuromuscular, sensory, visual, perceptual, and cognitive functions, and body structures such as cardiovascular, digestive, integumentary, and genitourinary systems;
    • Habits, routines, roles, and behavior patterns;
    • Cultural, physical, environmental, social, and spiritual contexts and activity demands that affect performance; and
    • Performance skills, including motor, process, and communication and interaction skills.

Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

    • Therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities;
    • Training in self-care, self-management, home management, and community and work reintegration;
    • Identification, development, remediation, or compensation of physical, cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory functions, sensory processing, and behavioral skills;
    • Therapeutic use of self, including a person's personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process;
    • Education and training of individuals, including family members, caregivers, and others;
    •  Care coordination, case management, and transition services;
    • Consultative services to groups, programs, organizations, or communities;
    • Modification of environments such as home, work, school, or community and adaptation of processes, including the application of ergonomic principles;
    • Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in assistive technology and adaptive and orthotic devices and training in the use of prosthetic devices, excluding glasses, contact lenses, or other prescriptive devices to correct vision unless prescribed by an optometrist;
    • Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including wheelchair management;
    • Driver rehabilitation and community mobility;
    • Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance;
    • Application of physical agent modalities and therapeutic procedures such as wound management; techniques to enhance sensory, perceptual, and cognitive processing; and manual techniques to enhance performance skills.

Colo. Rev. Stat. 12-40.5-103

Connecticut

"Occupational therapy" means the evaluation, planning, and implementation of a program of purposeful activities to develop or maintain adaptive skills necessary to achieve the maximal physical and mental functioning of the individual in his daily pursuits. The practice of "occupational therapy" includes, but is not limited to, evaluation and treatment of individuals whose abilities to cope with the tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, learning disabilities, poverty and cultural differences, physical injury or disease, psychological and social disabilities, or anticipated dysfunction, using:

    • Such treatment techniques as task-oriented activities to prevent or correct physical or emotional deficits or to minimize the disabling effect of these deficits in the life of the individual,
    • Such evaluation techniques as assessment of sensory motor abilities, assessment of the development of self-care activities and capacity for independence, assessment of the physical capacity for prevocational and work tasks, assessment of play and leisure performance, and appraisal of living areas for the handicapped,
    • Specific occupational therapy techniques such as activities of daily living skills, the fabrication and application of splinting devices, sensory motor activities, the use of specifically designed manual and creative activities, guidance in the selection and use of adaptive equipment, specific exercises to enhance functional performance, and treatment techniques for physical capabilities for work activities. Such techniques are applied in the treatment of individual patients or clients, in groups, or through social systems.

Conn. Gen. Stat. § 20-74a.

Delaware

"Occupational therapy services" includes any of the following:

    • The assessment, treatment, and education of or consultation with an individual, family, or other persons.
    • Interventions directed toward developing, improving, or restoring daily living skills, work readiness or work performance, play skills, or leisure capacities, or enhancing educational performance skills.
    • Providing for the development, improvement, or restoration of sensorimotor, oral motor, perceptual or neuromuscular functioning, or emotional, motivational, cognitive, or psychosocial components of performance.

Occupational therapy services" or "practice of occupational therapy" may require assessment of the need for use of interventions such as the design, development, adaptation, application, or training in the use of assistive technology devices; the design, fabrication, or application of rehabilitative technology such as selected orthotic devices; training in the use of assistive technology, orthotic or prosthetic devices; the application of thermal agent modalities, including paraffin, hot and cold packs, and fluido therapy, as an adjunct to, or in preparation for, purposeful activity; the use of ergonomic principles; the adaptation of environments and processes to enhance functional performance; or the promotion of health and wellness.

24 Del. Laws § 2002

Florida

Occupational therapy services include, but are not limited to:

    • The assessment, treatment, and education of or consultation with the individual, family, or other persons.
    • Interventions directed toward developing daily living skills, work readiness or work performance, play skills or leisure capacities, or enhancing educational performance skills.
    • Providing for the development of: sensory-motor, perceptual, or neuromuscular functioning; range of motion; or emotional, motivational, cognitive, or psychosocial components of performance.

These services may require assessment of the need for use of interventions such as the design, development, adaptation, application, or training in the use of assistive technology devices; the design, fabrication, or application of rehabilitative technology such as selected orthotic devices; training in the use of assistive technology; orthotic or prosthetic devices; the application of physical agent modalities as an adjunct to or in preparation for purposeful activity; the use of ergonomic principles; the adaptation of environments and processes to enhance functional performance; or the promotion of health and wellness.

The use of devices subject to 21 C.F.R. s. 801.109 and identified by the board is expressly prohibited except by an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant who has received training as specified by the board. The board shall adopt rules to carry out the purpose of this provision.

Fla. Stat. 468.203

Georgia

"Occupational therapy" includes but is not limited to the following:

Evaluation and treatment of individuals whose abilities to cope with the tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficiencies, the aging process, learning disabilities, poverty and cultural differences, physical injury or disease, psychological and social disabilities, or anticipated dysfunction. The treatment utilizes task oriented activities to prevent or correct physical, cognitive, or emotional deficiencies or to minimize the disabling effect of these deficiencies in the life of the individual;

Such evaluation techniques as assessment of sensory motor abilities, assessment of the development of self-care activities and capacity for independence, assessment of the physical capacity for prevocational and work tasks, assessment of play and leisure performance, and appraisal of living areas for persons with disabilities; and

Specific occupational therapy techniques, such as activity analysis, activities of daily living skills, the fabrication and application of splints and adaptive devices, sensory motor activities, the use of specifically designed manual and creative activities, guidance in the selection and use of adaptive equipment, specific exercises and physical agent modalities to enhance physical functional performance, work capacities, and treatment techniques for physical capabilities and cognitive retraining. Such techniques are applied in the treatment of individual patients or clients, in groups, or through social systems.

Ga. Code Ann. § 43-28-3

Hawaii

The practice of occupational therapy is the therapeutic use of everyday life activities with individuals or groups for the purpose of participation in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. It includes:

Evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

    • Client factors, including body functions, such as neuromusculoskeletal, sensory-perceptual, visual, mental, cognitive, and pain factors; body structures, such as cardiovascular, digestive, nervous, integumentary, genitourinary systems, and structures related to movement, values, beliefs, and spirituality;
    • Habits, routines, roles, rituals, and behavior patterns;
    • Occupational and social environments, cultural, personal, temporal, and virtual contexts and activity demands that affect performance; and
    • Performance skills, including motor and praxis, sensory-perceptual, emotional regulation, cognitive, communication, and social skills;

Methods or approaches selected to direct the process of interventions, including:

    • Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed, is impaired, or is in decline;
    • Compensation, modification, or adaptation of activity or environment to enhance performance or prevent injuries, disorders, or other conditions;
    • Retention and enhancement of skills or abilities without which performance in everyday life activities would decline;
    • Promotion of health and wellness, including the use of self-management strategies, to enable or enhance performance in everyday life activities; and
    • Prevention of barriers to performance and participation, including injury and disability prevention; and

Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

    • Therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities;
    • Training in self-care, self-management, health management and maintenance, home management, community reintegration, work reintegration, school activities, and work performance;
    • Development, remediation, or compensation of neuromusculoskeletal, sensory-perceptual, visual, mental, and cognitive functions; pain tolerance and management; and behavioral skills;
    • Therapeutic use of self, including one's personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process;
    • Education and training of individuals, including family members, caregivers, groups, populations, and others;
  • Care coordination, case management, and transition services;
    • Consultative services to groups, programs, organizations, or communities;
    • Modification of environments, such as home, work, school, or community, and adaptation of processes, including the application of ergonomic principles;
    • Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in seating and positioning; assistive technology; adaptive devices; orthotic devices; and training in the use of prosthetic devices;
    • Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including management of wheelchairs and other mobility devices;
    • Low vision rehabilitation;
    •  Driver rehabilitation and community mobility;
    • Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance;
    • Application of physical agent modalities and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures, such as wound care management, interventions to enhance sensory-perceptual and cognitive processing, and manual therapy, to enhance performance skills; and
    • Facilitating the occupational performance of groups, populations, or organizations through the modification of environments and the adaptation of processes.

H.R.S. §457G-1.5

Idaho

"Practice of occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (occupations) with individuals or groups for the purpose of participation in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness and to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction.

Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being and quality of life. The practice of occupational therapy includes:

Development of occupation-based plans, methods or strategies selected to direct the process of interventions such as:

    • Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed or is impaired.
    • Compensation, modification, or adaptation of activity or environment to enhance performance.
    • Maintenance and enhancement of capabilities without which performance in everyday life activities would decline.
    • Health promotion and wellness to enable or enhance performance in everyday life activities.
    • Prevention of barriers to performance, including disability prevention.

Evaluation of factors affecting a client’s occupational performance areas of activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

  • ·         Client factors, including body functions (such as neuromuscular, sensory, visual, perceptual, cognitive), values, beliefs, and spirituality, and body structures (such as cardiovascular, digestive, integumentary, genitourinary systems).
  • ·         Performance patterns, including habits, routines, roles, and behavior patterns.
  • ·         Contexts and activity demands that affect performance, including cultural, physical, environmental, social, virtual and temporal.
  • ·         Performance skills, including sensory perceptual skills, motor and praxis skills, emotional regulation skills, cognitive skills, communication and social skills.

Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, rest and sleep, including:

  • ·         Therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities.
  • ·         Training in self-care, self-management, home management, and community/work reintegration.
  • ·         Development, remediation, or compensation of physical, cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory functions and behavioral skills.
  • ·         Therapeutic use of self, including one’s personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process.
  • ·         Education and training of individuals, including family members, caregivers, and others.
  • ·         Care coordination, case management, and transition services.
  • ·         Consultative services to groups, programs, organizations, or communities.
  • ·         Modification of environments (home, work, school, or community) and adaptation of processes, including the application of ergonomic principles.
  • ·         Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in assistive technology, adaptive devices, orthotic devices, and prosthetic devices.
  • ·         Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including wheelchair management.
  • ·         Driver rehabilitation and community mobility.
  • ·         Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance.
  • ·         Application of superficial, thermal and mechanical physical agent modalities, and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures (such as basic wound management; techniques to enhance sensory, perceptual, and cognitive processing; therapeutic exercise techniques to facilitate participation in occupations) to enhance performance skills.
  • ·         Use of specialized knowledge and skills as attained through continuing education and experience for the application of deep thermal and electrotherapeutic modalities, therapeutic procedures specific to occupational therapy and wound care management for treatment to enhance participation in occupations as defined by rules adopted by the board.

Idaho Code Ann. 54-3702

Illinois

"Occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful occupations or goal-directed activities to evaluate and provide interventions for individuals, groups, and populations who have a disease or disorder, an impairment, an activity limitation, or a participation restriction that interferes with their ability to function independently in their daily life roles, including activities of daily living (ADLs) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs).

Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of habilitation, rehabilitation, and to promote health and wellness. Occupational therapy may be provided via technology or telecommunication methods, also known as telehealth, however the standard of care shall be the same whether a patient is seen in person, through telehealth, or other method of electronically enabled health care. Occupational therapy practice may include any of the following:

  • Remediation or restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological, or neurological processes;
  • Modification or adaptation of task, process, or the environment or the teaching of compensatory techniques in order to enhance performance;
  • Disability prevention methods and techniques that facilitate the development or safe application of performance skills; and
  • Health and wellness promotion strategies, including self-management strategies, and practices that enhance performance abilities.

"Occupational therapy services" means services that may be provided to individuals, groups, and populations, when provided to treat an occupational therapy need, including the following:

  • Evaluating, developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring skills in activities of daily living, work, or productive activities, including instrumental activities of daily living and play and leisure activities; sensorimotor, cognitive, or psychosocial components of performance with considerations for cultural context and activity demands that affect performance;
  • Designing, fabricating, applying, or training in the use of assistive technology, adaptive devices, seating and positioning, or temporary, orthoses and training in the use of orthoses and prostheses;
  • Adapting environments and processes, including the application of ergonomic principles, to enhance performance and safety in daily life roles;
  • For the occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant possessing advanced training, skill, and competency as demonstrated through criteria that shall be determined by the Department, applying physical agent modalities as an adjunct to or in preparation for engagement in occupations;
  • Evaluating and providing intervention in collaboration with the client, family, caregiver, or others;
  • Educating the client, family, caregiver, or others in carrying out appropriate nonskilled interventions;
  • Consulting with groups, programs, organizations, or communities to provide population-based services;
  • Assessing, recommending, and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including wheelchair management;
  • Driver rehabilitation and community mobility;
  • Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable or enhance performance of these tasks;
  • Low vision rehabilitation;
  • Lymphedema and wound care management;
  • Pain management; and
  • Care coordination, case management, and transition services.

225 ILCS 75/2

Indiana

"Practice of occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of everyday life occupations and occupational therapy services to:

  • ·         Aid individuals or groups to participate in meaningful roles and situations in the home, school, the workplace, the community, or other settings;
  • ·         Promote health and wellness through research and practice; and
  • ·         Serve individuals or groups who are well but have been or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction.

"Occupational therapy services" means services that are provided to promote health and wellness, prevent disability, preserve functional capabilities, prevent barriers for occupational performance from occurring, and enable or improve performance in everyday activities, including services that do the following:

Establish, remediate, or restore a skill or ability that is impaired or not yet developed. Occupational therapy services include identifying speech, language, and hearing that are impaired or not yet developed, but does not include the remediation of speech, language, and hearing skills and abilities.

Modify or adapt a person or an activity or environment of a person or compensate for a loss of a person's functions.

Evaluate factors that affect daily living activities, instrumental activities of daily living, and other activities relating to work, play, leisure, education, and social participation. These factors may include body functions, body structure, habits, routines, role performance, behavior patterns, sensory motor skills, cognitive skills, communication and interaction skills, and cultural, physical, psychosocial, spiritual, developmental, environmental, and socioeconomic contexts and activities that affect performance.

Perform interventions and procedures relating to the factors including the following:

  • ·         Task analysis and therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities.
  • ·         Education and training in self-care, self-management, home management, and community or work reintegration.
  • ·         Care coordination, case management, transition, and consultative services.
  • ·         Modification of environments and adaptation processes, including the application of ergonomic and safety principles.
  • ·         Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in assistive technology, adaptive devices, and orthotic devices, and training in the use of prosthetic devices. However, this does not include the following:
  • o   Gait training.
  • o   Training in the use of hearing aids, tracheoesophageal valves, speaking valves, or electrolarynx devices related to the oral production of language.
  • o   Remediation of speech, language, and hearing disorders.
  • o   Fabrication of shoe inserts.
  • ·         Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance safety, functional mobility, and community mobility, including wheelchair management and mobility. However, this does not include gait training.
  • ·         Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance.
  • ·         Application of physical agent modalities and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures used in preparation for or concurrently with purposeful and occupation based activities, including techniques to enhance sensory-motor, perceptual, and cognitive processing, manual therapy techniques, and adjunctive and preparatory activities for occupational performance. However, manual therapy does not include spinal manipulation, spinal adjustment, or grade 5 mobilization.

IC 25-23.5-1-6.5

Iowa

“Occupational therapy” means the therapeutic use of occupations, including everyday life activities with individuals, groups, populations, or organizations to support participation, performance, and function in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. Occupational therapy services are provided for habilitation, rehabilitation, and the promotion of health and wellness to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory-perceptual, and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts and environments to support engagement in occupations that affect physical and mental health, well-being, and quality of life. “Occupational therapy” includes but is not limited to providing assessment, design, fabrication, application, and fitting of selected orthotic devices and training in the use of prosthetic devices.

Iowa Code 148B.2

Kansas

"Practice of occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful occupations (goal-directed activities) to evaluate and treat, pursuant to the referral, supervision, order or direction of a physician, a licensed podiatrist, a licensed dentist, a licensed physician assistant, or a licensed advanced practice registered nurse working pursuant to the order or direction of a person licensed to practice medicine and surgery, a licensed chiropractor, or a licensed optometrist, individuals who have a disease or disorder, impairment, activity limitation or participation restriction that interferes with their ability to function independently in daily life roles and to promote health and wellness. Occupational therapy intervention may include:

  • Remediation or restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological or neurological cognitive processes;
  • Adaptation of tasks, process, or the environment or the teaching of compensatory techniques in order to enhance performance;
  • Disability prevention methods and techniques that facilitate the development or safe application of performance skills; and
  • Health promotion strategies and practices that enhance performance abilities.

"Occupational therapy services" include, but are not limited to:

  • Evaluating, developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring skills in activities of daily living (ADL), work or productive activities, including instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) and play and leisure activities;
  • Evaluating, developing, remediating, or restoring sensorimotor, cognitive or psychosocial components of performance;
  • Designing, fabricating, applying, or training in the use of assistive technology or orthotic devices and training in the use of prosthetic devices;
  • Adapting environments and processes, including the application of ergonomic principles, to enhance performance and safety in daily life roles;
  • Applying physical agent modalities as an adjunct to or in preparation for engagement in occupations;
  • Evaluating and providing intervention in collaboration with the client, family, caregiver or others;
  • Educating the client, family, caregiver or others in carrying out appropriate nonskilled interventions; and
  • Consulting with groups, programs, organizations or communities to provide population-based services.

K.S.A. 65-5402

Kentucky

"Practice of occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful occupations (goal-directed activities) to evaluate and treat individuals who have a disease or disorder, impairment, activity limitation, or participation restriction that interferes with their ability to function independently in daily life roles, and to promote health and wellness. Occupational therapy intervention may include:

  • ·         Remediation or restoration, through goal-directed activities, of those performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, or neurological processes;
  • ·         Adaptation of task, process, or the environment or the teaching of compensatory techniques to enhance performance;
  • ·         Disability prevention methods and techniques that facilitate the development or safe application of performance skills; and
  • ·         Health promotion strategies and practices that enhance performance abilities.

"Occupational therapy services" include but are not limited to:

  • ·         Evaluating, developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring skills in basic and instrumental activities of daily living (BADLs and IADLs), work or productive activities, and play and leisure activities;
  • ·         Evaluating, developing, remediating, or restoring components of performance as they relate to sensorimotor, cognitive, or psychosocial aspects;
  • ·         Designing, fabricating, applying, and training in the use of assistive technology or orthotic devices and training in the use of prosthetic devices for functional mobility and activities of daily living;
  • ·         Adapting environments and processes, including the application of ergonomic principles, to enhance performance and safety in daily life roles;
  • ·         Applying superficial physical agent modalities as an adjunct to or in preparation for engagement in occupations;
  • ·         Applying deep physical agent modalities as an adjunct to or in preparation for engagement in occupations;
  • ·         Evaluating and providing intervention in collaboration with the client, family, caregiver, or others;
  • ·         Educating the client, family, caregiver, or others in carrying out appropriate nonskilled interventions; and
  • ·         Consulting with groups, programs, organizations, or communities to provide population-based services.

Ky. Rev. Stat. 319A.010

Louisiana

"Occupational therapy" means the application of any activity in which one engages for the purposes of evaluation, interpretation, treatment planning, and treatment of problems interfering with functional performance in persons impaired by physical illness or injury, emotional disorders, congenital or developmental disabilities, or the aging process, in order to achieve optimum functioning and prevention and health maintenance. The occupational therapist may enter a case for the purposes of providing consultation and indirect services and evaluating an individual for the need of services. Prevention, wellness, and education related services shall not require a referral; however, in workers' compensation injuries preauthorization shall be required by the employer or workers' compensation insurer or provider. Implementation of direct occupational therapy to individuals for their specific medical condition or conditions shall be based on a referral or order from a physician, advanced practice registered nurse, dentist, podiatrist, or optometrist licensed to practice. Practice shall be in accordance with published standards of practice established by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc., and the essentials of accreditation established by the agencies recognized to accredit specific facilities and programs. (b) Specific occupational therapy services include, but are not limited to activities of daily living (ADL); the design, fabrication, and application of prescribed temporary splints; sensorimotor activities; the use of specifically designed crafts; guidance in the selection and use of adaptive equipment; therapeutic activities to enhance functional performance; prevocational evaluation and training and consultation concerning the adaptation of physical environments for persons with disabilities. These services are provided to individuals or groups through medical, health, educational, and social systems

LSA-R.S. §3003

Maine

 "Occupational therapy" means the assessment, planning and implementation of a program of purposeful activities to develop or maintain adaptive skills necessary to achieve the maximal physical and mental functioning of the individual in the individual's daily pursuits. The practice of "occupational therapy" includes, but is not limited to, assessment and treatment of individuals whose abilities to cope with the tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, learning disabilities, poverty and cultural differences, physical injury or disease, psychological and social disabilities or anticipated dysfunction, using:

  • ·         Treatment techniques such as task-oriented activities to prevent or correct physical or emotional deficits or to minimize the disabling effect of these deficits in the life of the individual; 
  • ·         Assessment techniques such as assessment of cognitive and sensory motor abilities, assessment of the development of self-care activities and capacity for independence, assessment of the physical capacity for prevocational and work tasks, assessment of play and leisure performance and appraisal of living areas for the disabled;
  • ·         Specific occupational therapy techniques such as daily living skill activities, the fabrication and application of splinting devices, sensory motor activities, the use of specifically designed manual and creative activities, guidance in the selection and use of adaptive equipment, specific exercises to enhance functional performance and treatment techniques for physical capabilities for work activities. 

The techniques may be applied in the treatment of individuals or groups.

32 MRSA § 2272

Maryland

Occupational therapy principles -- "Occupational therapy principles" include:

  • ·         The use of therapeutic activities that promote independence in daily life roles;
  • ·         Remediation or restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological, or neurological processes;
  • ·         In order to enhance performance, the adaption of task, process, or the environment, or the teaching of compensatory techniques;
  • ·         Methods and techniques for preventing disability that facilitate the development or safe application of performance skills;
  • ·         Health promotion strategies and practices that enhance performance abilities; and
  • ·         Education, instruction, and research in the practice of occupational therapy.

 Occupational therapy procedures. -- 

  • ·         "Occupational therapy procedures" include:
  • o   Developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring skills in activities of daily living, work, or productive activities, including:
  • §  Instrumental activities of daily activity; and
  • §  Play and leisure activities;
  • o   Developing, remediating, or restoring sensorimotor, perceptual, cognitive, or psychological components of performance;
  • o   Designing, fabricating, applying, or training in the use of assistive technology, splinting, or orthotic devices, including training in the use of prosthetic devices;
  • o   Adapting environments and processes, including the application of ergonomic principles to enhance performance and safety in daily life roles;
  • o   Applying physical agent modalities as adjuncts to or in preparation for purposeful activity with appropriate training, as specified by the Board in regulations;
  • o   Promoting safe, functional mobility in daily life tasks;
  • o   Providing intervention in collaboration with the client, the client's family, the client's caregiver, or others;
  • o   Educating the client, the client's family, the client's caregiver, or others in carrying out appropriate nonskilled interventions; and
  • o   Consulting with groups, programs, organizations, and communities to provide population-based services.
  • ·         "Occupational therapy procedures" do not include the adjustment or manipulation of any of the osseous structures of the body or spine.

Md. HEALTH OCCUPATIONS Code Ann. § 10-101

Massachusetts

''Occupational therapy'', the application of principles, methods and procedures of evaluation, problem identification, treatment, education, and consultation which utilizes purposeful activity in order to maximize independence, prevent or correct disability, and maintain health. These services are used with individuals, throughout the life span, whose abilities to interact with their environment are limited by physical injury or illness, disabilities, poverty and cultural differences or the aging process. Occupational therapy includes but is not limited to:

  • ·         Administering and interpreting tests necessary for effective treatment planning;
  • ·         Developing daily living skills, perceptual motor skills, sensory integrative functioning, play skills and prevocational and vocational work capacities;
  • ·         Designing, fabricating or applying selected orthotic and prosthetic devices or selected adaptive equipment;
  • ·         Utilizing designated modalities, superficial heat and cold, and neuromuscular facilitation techniques to improve or enhance joint motion muscle function;
  • ·         Designing and applying specific therapeutic activities and exercises to enhance or monitor functional or motor performance and to reduce stress; and
  • ·         Adapting environments for the handicapped. These services are provided to individuals or groups through medical, health, educational, industrial or social systems.

Occupational therapy shall also include delegating of selective forms of treatment to occupational therapy assistants and occupational therapy aides; provided, however, that the occupational therapist so delegating shall assume the responsibility for the care of the patient and the supervision of the occupational therapy assistant or the occupational therapy aide.

M.G.L. Chapter 112, § 23A

Michigan

"Occupational therapy services" means those services provided to promote health and wellness, prevent disability, preserve functional capabilities, prevent barriers, and enable or improve performance in everyday activities, including, but not limited to, the following:

Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that is impaired or not yet developed.

Compensation, modification, or adaptation of a person, activity, or environment.

Evaluation of factors that affect activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, and other activities relating to education, work, play, leisure, and social participation. Those factors include, but are not limited to, body functions, body structure, habits, routines, role performance, behavior patterns, sensory motor skills, cognitive skills, communication and interaction skills, and cultural, physical, psychosocial, spiritual, developmental, environmental, and socioeconomic contexts and activities that affect performance.

Interventions and procedures, including, but not limited to, any of the following:

    • Task analysis and therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities.
    • Training in self-care, self-management, home management, and community or work reintegration.
    • Development remediation, or compensation of client factors such as body functions and body structure.
    •  Education and training.
    • Care coordination, case management, transition, and consultative services.
    •  Modification of environments and adaptation processes such as the application of ergonomic and safety principles.
    • Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting, and training in rehabilitative and assistive technology, adaptive devices, and low temperature orthotic devices, and training in the use of prosthetic devices. For the purposes of this sub-subparagraph, the design and fabrication of low temperature orthotic devices does not include permanent orthotics.
    • Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance safety, functional mobility, and community mobility such as wheelchair management and mobility.
    • Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing.
    • Application of physical agent modalities and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures, including, but not limited to, techniques to enhance sensory-motor, perceptual, and cognitive processing, manual therapy techniques, and adjunctive and preparatory activities.
    • Providing vision therapy services or low vision rehabilitation services, if those services are provided pursuant to a referral or prescription from, or under the supervision or comanagement of, a physician licensed under part 170 or 175 or an optometrist licensed under part 174.

Mich. Comp. Laws § 333.18301

Minnesota

"Occupational therapy" means the use of purposeful activity to maximize the independence and the maintenance of health of an individual who is limited by a physical injury or illness, a cognitive impairment, a psychosocial dysfunction, a mental illness, a developmental or learning disability, or an adverse environmental condition. The practice encompasses evaluation, assessment, treatment, and consultation. Occupational therapy services may be provided individually, in groups, or through social systems.

Minn. Stat. § 148.6402

Mississippi

Occupational therapy means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful (goal-directed) activities and/or exercises to evaluate and treat an individual who has, or is at risk for, a disease or disorder, impairment, activity limitation or participation restriction which interferes with his ability to function independently in daily life roles and to promote health and wellness across his lifespan.

Occupational therapy intervention includes:

    • Remediation or restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological or neurological processes;
    •  Adaptation of task, process or the environment, or the teaching of compensatory techniques in order to enhance functional performance;
    • Disability prevention methods and techniques which facilitate the development or safe application of functional performance skills; or
    • Health promotion strategies and practices which enhance functional performance abilities.

Occupational therapy service includes, but is not limited to:

    • Evaluating, developing, improving, sustaining or restoring skill in activities of daily living (ADLS), work or productive activities, including instrumental activities of daily living (IADLS), play and leisure activities;
    • Evaluating, developing, remediating or restoring physical, sensorimotor, cognitive or psycho social components of performance;
    • Designing, fabricating, applying or training in the use of assistive technology or orthotic devices, and training in the use of prosthetic devices;
    • Adaptation of environments and processes, including the application of ergonomic principles, to enhance functional performance and safety in daily life roles;
    • Application of physical agent modalities as an adjunct to or in preparation for engagement in an occupation or functional activity;
    • Evaluating and providing intervention in collaboration with the client, family, caregiver or other person responsible for the client;
    • Educating the client, family, caregiver or others in carrying out appropriate nonskilled interventions;
    • Consulting with groups, programs, organizations or communities to provide population-based services; or
    • Participation in administration, education, and research, including both clinical and academic environments.

15 Miss. Code. Rule 8.1.3

Missouri

"Occupational therapy", the use of purposeful activity or interventions designed to achieve functional outcomes which promote health, prevent injury or disability and which develop, improve, sustain or restore the highest possible level of independence of any individual who has an injury, illness, cognitive impairment, psychosocial dysfunction, mental illness, developmental or learning disability, physical disability or other disorder or condition.  It shall include assessment by means of skill observation or evaluation through the administration and interpretation of standardized or nonstandardized tests and measurements.  Occupational therapy services include, but are not limited to:

    • The assessment and provision of treatment in consultation with the individual, family or other appropriate persons;
    • Interventions directed toward developing, improving, sustaining or restoring daily living skills, including self-care skills and activities that involve interactions with others and the environment, work readiness or work performance, play skills or leisure capacities or enhancing educational performances skills;
    • Developing, improving, sustaining or restoring sensorimotor, oral-motor, perceptual or neuromuscular functioning; or emotional, motivational, cognitive or psychosocial components of performance; and
    • Education of the individual, family or other appropriate persons in carrying out appropriate interventions. 

Such services may encompass assessment of need and the design, development, adaptation, application or training in the use of assistive technology devices; the design, fabrication or application of rehabilitative technology such as selected orthotic devices, training in the use of orthotic or prosthetic devices; the application of ergonomic principles; the adaptation of environments and processes to enhance functional performance; or the promotion of health and wellness.

Mo. Rev. Stat. § 324.050

Montana

"Occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of purposeful goal-directed activities and interventions to achieve functional outcomes to maximize the independence and the maintenance of health of an individual who is limited by disease or disorders, impairments, activity limitations, or participation restrictions that interfere with the individual's ability to function independently in daily life roles. The practice encompasses evaluation, assessment, treatment, consultation, remediation, and restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological, or neurological processes. Occupational therapy services may be provided individually, in groups, or through social systems. Occupational therapy interventions include but are not limited to:

    • Evaluating, developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring skills in activities of daily living, work or productive activities, including instrumental activities of daily living, and play and leisure activities;
    • Developing perceptual-motor skills and sensory integrative functioning;
    • Developing play skills and leisure capacities and enhancing educational performance skills;
    • Designing, fabricating, or applying orthotic or prosthetic devices, applying and training in the use of assistive technology, and training in the use of orthotic and prosthetic devices;
    • Providing for the development of emotional, motivational, cognitive, psychosocial, or physical components of performance;
    • Providing assessment and evaluation, including the use of skilled observation or the administration and interpretation of standardized or nonstandardized tests and measurements to identify areas for occupational therapy services;
    • Adaptation of task, process, or the environment, as well as teaching of compensatory techniques, in order to enhance performance;
    • Developing feeding and swallowing skills;
    • Enhancing and assessing work performance and work readiness through occupational therapy intervention, including education and instruction, activities to increase and improve general work behavior and skill, job site evaluation, on-the-job training and evaluation, development of work-related activities, and supported employment placement;
    • Providing neuromuscular facilitation and inhibition, including the activation, facilitation, and inhibition of muscle action, both voluntary and involuntary, through the use of appropriate sensory stimulation, including vibration or brushing, to evoke a desired muscular response;
    • Application of physical agent modalities, as defined in this section, as an adjunct to or in preparation for engagement in purposeful goal-directed activity;
    • Promoting health and wellness;
    • Evaluating and providing intervention in collaboration with the client, family, caregiver, or others;
    • Educating the client, family, caregiver, or others in carrying out appropriate nonskilled interventions;
    • Consulting with groups, programs, organizations, or communities to provide population-based services; and
    • Use of prescribed topical medications.

Mont. Code. Ann. § 37-24-103

Nebraska

Occupational therapy means the use of purposeful activity with individuals who are limited by physical injury or illness, psychosocial dysfunction, developmental or learning disabilities, or the aging process in order to maximize independent function, prevent further disability, and achieve and maintain health and productivity. Occupational therapy encompasses evaluation, treatment, and consultation and may include:

    • Remediation or restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological, or neurological processes;
    • Adaptation of task, process, or the environment, or the teaching of compensatory techniques, in order to enhance performance;
    • Disability prevention methods and techniques which facilitate the development or safe application of performance skills; and
    • Health promotion strategies and practices which enhance performance abilities.

172 NAC 114

Nevada

“Occupational therapy” means the use of evaluations, teachings and interventions to facilitate the activities of daily living of a client in groups or on an individual basis to enable the client to participate in and perform activities of daily living in various settings, including, without limitation, at home, at school, in the workplace and in the community. The term includes:

    • Providing services for habilitation, rehabilitation and the promotion of health and wellness to a client;
    • Assisting a client in achieving the highest practicable physical, cognitive and psychosocial well-being to improve the physical and mental health of the client and the quality of life of the client;
    • Teaching a client skills for daily living;
    • Assisting a client in the development of cognitive and perceptual motor skills, and in the integration of sensory functions;
    • Assisting a client in learning to play and to use his or her leisure time constructively;
    • Assisting a client in developing functional skills necessary to be considered for employment;
    • Assessing the need for, designing, constructing and training a client in the use and application of selected orthotic devices and adaptive equipment;
    • Assessing the need for prosthetic devices for the upper body and training a client in the functional use of prosthetic devices;
    • Teaching a client crafts and exercises designed to enhance his or her ability to function normally;
    • Administering to a client manual tests of his or her muscles and range of motion, and interpreting the results of those tests;
    • Incorporating into the treatment of a client the safe and appropriate use of physical agent modalities and techniques which have been acquired through an appropriate program of education approved by the Board pursuant to subsection 2 of NRS 640A.120, or through a program of continuing education or higher education; and
    • Adapting the environment of a client to reduce the effects of handicaps.

NRS 640A.050

New Hampshire

"Occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful occupations or goal-directed activities to evaluate and treat individuals who have a disease or disorder, impairment, activity limitation, or participation restriction which interferes with their ability to function independently in daily life roles, and to promote health and wellness. 

Occupational therapy intervention may include: 

    • Remediation or restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological, or neurological processes. 
    • Adaptation of task, process, or the environment, or the teaching of compensatory techniques, in order to enhance performance. 
    • Disability prevention methods and techniques which facilitate the development or safe application of performance skills. 
    • Health promotion strategies and practices which enhance performance abilities. 

Occupational therapy services include, but are not limited to: 

    • Evaluating, developing, improving, sustaining or restoring skills in activities of daily living, work or productive activities, including instrumental activities of daily living, and play and leisure activities.
    • Evaluating, developing, remediating, or restoring sensorimotor, cognitive, or psychosocial components of performance. 
    • Designing, fabricating, applying, or training in the use of assistive technology or orthotic devices, and training in the use of prosthetic devices. 
    • Adaptation of environments and processes, including the application of ergonomic principles, to enhance performance and safety in daily life roles. 
    • Application of physical agent modalities as an adjunct to, or in preparation for, engagement in purposeful activities and occupations. 
    • Evaluating and providing intervention in collaboration with the client, family, caregiver, or others. 
    • Educating the client, family, caregiver, or others in carrying out appropriate non-skilled interventions. 
    • Consulting with groups, programs, organizations, or communities to provide population-based services. 

N.H. Rev. Stat. Ann. 326-C:1

New Jersey

"Occupational therapy" means the evaluation, planning and implementation of a program of purposeful activities to develop or maintain functional skills necessary to achieve the maximal physical or mental functioning, or both, of the individual in his daily occupational performance. The tasks of daily living may be threatened or impaired by physical injury or illness, developmental deficits, sensorimotor dysfunction, psychological and social dysfunction, the aging process, poverty, or cultural deprivation. Occupational therapy utilizes task oriented activities adapted to prevent or correct physical or emotional deficits as well as to minimize the disabling effects of those deficits on the life of the individual. Occupational therapy services include the use of specific techniques which enhance functional performance and include, but are not limited to, the evaluation and assessment of an individual's self care, lifestyle performance patterns, work skills, performance related cognitive, sensory, motor, perceptual, affective, interpersonal and social functioning, vocational and prevocational capacities, the design, fabrication and application of adaptive equipment or prosthetic or orthotic devices, excluding dental devices, the administration of standardized and nonstandardized assessments, and consultation concerning the adaptation of physical environments for the handicapped. These services are provided to individuals or groups through medical, health, educational and social systems.

N.J.S.A. § 45:9-37.54

New Mexico

“Occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of everyday life activities with persons or groups to participate in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community and other settings to promote health and wellness in clients who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation or participation restriction.  "Occupational therapy" includes addressing the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts to support a client's engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being and quality of life.

N.M. Stat. 61-12A-3

New York

A functional evaluation within the meaning of Education Law, section 7901 may include screening, observing, consulting, administering and/or interpreting standardized and non-standardized assessment tools, and simulating and analyzing activities or environments for the purpose of:

  1. assessing levels of functional abilities and deficits resulting from developmental deficit, injury, disease or any limiting condition; and/or
  2. identifying areas of function and dysfunction in daily life tasks; and/or
  3. determining the need for and the types of initial and/or subsequent occupational therapy.

Purposeful activity is defined as goal-directed behavior aimed at the development of functional daily living skills in the categories of self-care, work, homemaking or play/leisure.

A treatment program within the meaning of Education Law, section 7901 shall be consistent with the statutory scope of practice and may:

  1. Include the therapeutic use of goal-directed activities, exercises, or techniques to maximize the client's physical and/or mental functioning in life tasks. Treatment is directed toward maximizing functional skill and task-related performance for the development of a client's vocational, avocational, daily living or related capacities.
  2. Relate to physical, perceptual, sensory, neuromuscular, sensory-integrative, cognitive or psychosocial skills.
  3. Include, where appropriate for such purposes, and under appropriate conditions, modalities and techniques based on approaches taught in an occupational therapy curriculum and included in a program of professional education in occupational therapy registered by the department, and consistent with areas of individual competence. These approaches are based on:
    1. The neurological and physiological sciences as taught in a registered occupational therapy professional education program. Modalities and techniques may be based on, but not limited to, any one or more of the following:
      1. sensory integrative approaches;
      2. developmental approaches;
      3. sensorimotor approaches;
      4. neurophysiological treatment approaches;
      5. muscle reeducation;
      6. superficial heat and cold; or
      7. cognitive and perceptual remediation.
    2. The behavioral and social sciences as taught in a registered occupational therapy professional education program. Modalities and techniques may be based on, but not limited to, any one or more of the following:
      1. behavioral principles;
      2. work-related programs and simulation;
      3. group dynamics and process; or
      4. leisure/avocational activities.
    3. The biomechanical sciences as taught in a registered occupational therapy professional education program. Modalities and techniques may be based on, but not limited to, any one or more of the following:
      1. passive, active assistive, and active range of motion;
      2. muscle strengthening and conditioning;
      3. positioning;
      4. participation in design, fabrication, and/or application, and patient education related to orthotics and adaptive equipment;
      5. evaluation of appropriateness, participation in design concept, application and patient education related to prosthetics;
      6. daily life tasks;
      7. adapting the client's environment; or
      8. work-related programs.

N.Y.C. R.R. Com Reg §76.5

North Carolina

“Occupational therapy” means a health care profession providing evaluation, treatment and consultation to help individuals achieve a maximum level of independence by developing skills and abilities interfered with by disease, emotional disorder, physical injury, the aging process, or impaired development. Occupational therapists use purposeful activities and specially designed orthotic and prosthetic devices to reduce specific impairments and to help individuals achieve independence at home and in the work place.

90-270.67

"Occupational Therapy evaluation, treatment, and consultation" include the following:

    • Remediation or restitution of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychosocial, and developmental process;
    • Adaptation of skills, process or environment, or the teachings of compensatory techniques in order to enhance performance;
    • Disability prevention methods and techniques that facilitate the development or safe application of performance skills;
    • Promotion of health and wellness to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction; and
    • Interpretation of the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in everyday life activities that affect health, well-being, and quality of life.

21 NAC 38.0103

North Dakota

"Occupational therapy practice" means the use of occupation and purposeful activity or intervention designed to achieve functional outcomes that promote health, prevent injury or disability, and which develop, improve, sustain, or restore the highest possible level of independence of any individual who has an injury, illness, cognitive impairment, psychosocial dysfunction, mental illness, developmental or learning disability, physical disability or other disorder or condition, and occupational therapy education. Occupational therapy encompasses evaluation, treatment, consultation, research, and education. Occupational therapy practice includes evaluation by skilled observation, administration, and interpretation of standardized and nonstandardized tests and measurements. The occupational therapy practitioner designs and implements interventions directed toward developing, improving, sustaining, and restoring sensorimotor, neuromuscular, emotional, cognitive, or psychosocial performance components. Interventions include activities that contribute to optimal occupational performance including self-care; daily living skills; skills essential for productivity, functional communication and mobility; positioning; social integration; cognitive mechanisms; enhancing play and leisure skills; and the design, provision, and training in the use of assistive technology, devices, orthotics, or prosthetics or environmental adaptations to accommodate for loss of occupational performance. Therapy may be provided individually or in groups to prevent secondary conditions, promote community integration, and support the individual's health and well-being within the social and cultural contexts of the individual's natural environment.

N.D. Cent. Code 43-40-01

Ohio

 “Occupational therapy” means the therapeutic use of everyday life activities or occupations with individuals or groups for the purpose of participation in roles and situations in the home, school, workplace, community, and other settings. The practice of occupational therapy includes all of the following:

  • Methods or strategies selected to direct the process of interventions, including, but not limited to, establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed or is impaired and compensation, modification, or adaptation of activity or environment to enhance performance;
  • Evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including, but not limited to, sensory motor abilities, vision, perception, cognition, psychosocial, and communication and interaction skills;
  • Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living, education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including, but not limited to, application of physical agent modalities, use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures to enhance performance skills, rehabilitation of driving skills to facilitate community mobility, and management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance;
  • Consultative services, case management, and education of patients, clients, or other individuals to promote self-management, home management, and community and work reintegration;
  • Designing, fabricating, applying, recommending, and instructing in the use of selected orthotic or prosthetic devices and other equipment which assists the individual to adapt to the individual’s potential or actual impairment;
  • Administration of topical drugs that have been prescribed by a licensed health professional authorized to prescribe drugs, as defined in section 4729.01 of the Revised Code.

Ohio Rev. Code 4755.04

Oklahoma

"Occupational therapy" is a health profession for which practitioners provide assessment, treatment, and consultation through the use of purposeful activity with individuals who are limited by or at risk of physical illness or injury, psycho-social dysfunction, developmental or learning disabilities, poverty and cultural differences or the aging process, in order to maximize independence, prevent disability, and maintain health. Specific occupational therapy services include but are not limited to the use of media and methods such as instruction in daily living skills and cognitive retraining, facilitating self-maintenance, work and leisure skills, using standardized or adapted techniques, designing, fabricating, and applying selected orthotic equipment or selective adaptive equipment with instructions, using therapeutically applied creative activities, exercise, and other media to enhance and restore functional performance, to administer and interpret tests which may include sensorimotor evaluation, psycho-social assessments, standardized or nonstandardized tests, to improve developmental skills, perceptual motor skills, and sensory integrative function, and to adapt the environment for the handicapped. These services are provided individually, in groups, or through social systems.

Title 59 O.S 888.3

Oregon

“Occupational therapy” means the analysis and use of purposeful activity with individuals who are limited by physical injury or illness, developmental or learning disabilities, psycho-social dysfunctions or the aging process in order to maximize independence, prevent disability and maintain health. The practice of occupational therapy encompasses evaluation, treatment and consultation. Specific occupational therapy services includes but is not limited to: Activities of daily living (ADL); perceptual motor and sensory integrated activity; development of work and leisure skills; the design, fabrication or application of selected orthotics or prosthetic devices; the use of specifically designed crafts; guidance in the selection and use of adaptive equipment; exercises to enhance functional performance; prevocational evaluation and training; performing and interpreting manual muscle and range of motion test; and appraisal and adaptation of environments for people with mental and physical disabilities. The services are provided individually, in groups, or through social systems.

ORS 675.210

Pennsylvania

"Occupational therapy." The evaluation of learning and performance skills and the analysis, selection and adaptation of activities for an individual whose abilities to cope with the activities of daily living, to perform tasks normally performed at a given stage of development and to perform essential vocational tasks which are threatened or impaired by that person's developmental deficiencies, aging process, environmental deprivation or physical, psychological, injury or illness, through specific techniques which include:

(1) Planning and implementing activity programs to improve sensory and motor functioning at the level of performance normal for the individual's stage of development.

(2) Teaching skills, behaviors and attitudes crucial to the individual's independent, productive and satisfying social functioning.

(3) The design, fabrication and application of orthotics to enhance performance in occupations, not to include prosthetic devices, and the adaptation of equipment necessary to assist patients in adjusting to a potential or actual impairment and instructing in the use of such devices and equipment.

(4) Analyzing, selecting and adapting activities to maintain the individual's optimal performance of tasks to prevent disability.

P.L. 502, No. 140 Cl. 63

Rhode Island

"Occupational therapy" (OT) is the use of purposeful activity or interventions designed to achieve functional outcomes which promote health, prevent injury or disability, and develop, improve, sustain, or restore the highest possible level of independence of any individual who has an injury, illness, cognitive impairment, sensory impairment, psychosocial dysfunction, mental illness, developmental or learning disability, physical disability, or other disorder or condition.

Occupational therapy includes evaluation by means of skilled observation of functional performance and/or assessment through the administration and interpretation of standardized or non-standardized tests and measurements.

"Occupational therapy services" includes, but is not limited to:

    • Evaluating and providing treatment in consultation with the individual, family, or other appropriate persons;
    • Interventions directed toward developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring daily living skills, including self-care skills and activities that involve interactions with others and the environment, work readiness or work performance, play skills or leisure capacities or educational performance skills;
    • Developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring sensory-motor, oral-motor, perceptual, or neuromuscular functioning; or emotional, motivational, cognitive, or psychosocial components of performance; and
    • Educating the individual, family, or other appropriate persons in carrying out appropriate interventions.

These services may encompass evaluating need; and designing, developing, adapting, applying, or training in the use of assistive technology devices; designing, fabricating or applying rehabilitative technology, such as selected orthotic devices; training in the functional use of orthotic or prosthetic devices; applying therapeutic activities, modalities, or exercise as an adjunct to or in preparation for functional performance; applying ergonomic principles; adapting environments and processes to enhance daily living skills; or promoting health and wellness.

R.I. Gen. Laws § 5-40.1-3

South Carolina

"Occupational therapy" means the functional evaluation and treatment of individuals whose ability to cope with the tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, poverty and cultural differences, physical injury or illness, or psychological or social disability. The treatment utilizes occupational, namely goal-oriented activities, to prevent or correct physical or emotional deficits or to minimize the disabling effect of these deficits in the life of the individual. Specific occupational therapy techniques include, but are not limited to, activities of daily living (ADL), the fabrication and application of splints, sensory-motor activities, the use of specifically designed crafts, guidance in the selection and use of adaptive equipment, exercises to enhance functional performance, prevocational evaluation and treatment and consultation concerning adaption of physical environments for the handicapped. These techniques are applied in the treatment of individual patients or clients, in groups, or through social systems.

S.C. Code Ann. 4-0-36-20

South Dakota

"Occupational therapy," the evaluation, planning and implementation of a program of purposeful activities to develop or maintain adaptive skills necessary to achieve the maximal physical and mental functioning of the individual in his or her daily pursuits. The practice of occupational therapy includes consultation, evaluation, and treatment of individuals whose abilities to cope with the tasks of living are threatened or impaired by developmental deficits, the aging process, learning disabilities, poverty and cultural differences, physical injury or disease, psychological and social disabilities, or anticipated dysfunction. Occupational therapy services include such treatment techniques as task-oriented activities to prevent or correct physical or emotional deficits or to minimize the disabling effect of these deficits in the life of the individual; such evaluation techniques as assessment of sensory integration and motor abilities, assessment of development of self-care and feeding, activities and capacity for independence, assessment of the physical capacity for prevocational and work tasks, assessment of play and leisure performance, and appraisal of living areas for the handicapped; physical agent modalities limited to the upper extremities to enhance physical functional performance, if certified in accordance with § 36-31-6; and specific occupational therapy techniques such as activities of daily living skills, designing, fabricating, or applying selected orthotic devices or selecting adaptive equipment, sensory integration and motor activities, the use of specifically designed manual and creative activities, specific exercises to enhance functional performance, and treatment techniques for physical capabilities for work activities. Such techniques are applied in the treatment of individual patients or clients, in groups, or through social systems;

S.D.C. § 36-31-1

Tennessee

"Occupational therapy practice" means the therapeutic use of everyday life activities (occupations) for the purpose of enabling individuals or groups to participate in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community and other settings. Occupational therapy addresses the physical, cognitive, psychosocial and sensory aspects of performance in a variety of contexts to support engagement in occupations that affect health, well-being and quality of life.

"Occupational therapy practice" includes, but is not limited to:

  • The screening, evaluation, assessment, planning, implementation and discharge planning of an occupational therapy program or services in consultation with the client, family members, caregivers and other appropriate persons;
  • Selection and administration of standardized and nonstandardized tests and measurements to evaluate factors affecting activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, education, work, play, leisure and social participation, including:
    • Body functions and body structures;
    • Habits, routines, roles and behavior patterns;
    • Cultural, physical, environmental, social and spiritual context and activity demands that affect performance; and
    • Performance skills, including motor, process and communication/interaction skills;
  • Methods or strategies selected to direct the process of interventions, such as:
    • Modification or adaptation of an activity or the environment to enhance performance;
    • Establishment, remediation or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed or is impaired;
    • Maintenance and enhancement of capabilities without which performance in occupations would decline;
    • Health promotion and wellness to enable or enhance performance and safety of occupations; and
    • Prevention of barriers to performance, including disability prevention;
  • Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, education, work, play, leisure and social participation, including:
    • Therapeutic use of occupations, exercises and activities;
    • Training in self-care, self-management, home management and community/work reintegration;
    • Development, remediation or compensation of physical, cognitive, neuromuscular and sensory functions and behavioral skills;
    • Therapeutic use of self, including an individual's personality, insights, perceptions and judgments as part of the therapeutic process;
    • Education and training of individuals, family members, caregivers and others;
    • Care coordination, case management, discharge planning and transition services;
    • Consulting services to groups, programs, organizations or communities;
    • Assessment, recommendations and training in techniques and equipment to enhance functional mobility, including wheelchair management;
    • Driver rehabilitation and community mobility; and
    • Management of feeding and eating skills to enable feeding and eating performance;
  • Management of occupational therapy services, including the planning, organizing, staffing, coordinating, directing or controlling of individuals and organizations;
  • Providing instruction in occupational therapy to students in an accredited occupational therapy or occupational therapy assistant educational program by persons who are trained as occupational therapists or occupational therapy assistants; and
  • Administration, interpretation and application of research to occupational therapy services;

Occupational therapy services are provided for the purpose of promoting health and wellness to those clients who have, or are at risk of developing, illness, injury, disease, disorder, impairment, disability, activity limitation or participation restriction and may include:

    • Training in the use of prosthetic devices;
    • Assessment, design, development, fabrication, adaptation, application, fitting and training in the use of assistive technology and adaptive and selective orthotic devices;
    • Application of physical agent modalities with proper training and certification;
    • Assessment and application of ergonomic principles; and
    • Adaptation or modification of environments, at home, work, school or community, and use of a range of therapeutic procedures, such as wound care management, techniques to enhance sensory, perceptual and cognitive processing and manual therapy techniques, to enhance performance skills, occupational performance or the promotion of health and wellness;

Occupational therapy practice may occur in a variety of settings, including, but not limited to:

    • Institutional inpatient settings, such as acute rehabilitation facilities, psychiatric hospitals, community and specialty hospitals, nursing facilities and prisons;
    • Outpatient settings, such as clinics, medical offices and therapist offices;
    • Home and community settings, such as homes, group homes, assisted living facilities, schools, early intervention centers, daycare centers, industrial and business facilities, hospices, sheltered workshops, wellness and fitness centers and community mental health facilities;
    • Research facilities; and
  • Educational institutions;

Tenn. Code Ann. § 63-13-103

Texas

Occupational Therapy Practice--Includes:

Methods or strategies selected to direct the process of interventions such as:

  • ·         Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed or is impaired.
  • ·         Compensation, modification, or adaptation of activity or environment to enhance performance.
  • ·         Maintenance and enhancement of capabilities without which  performance in everyday life activities would decline.
  • ·         Health promotion and wellness to enable or enhance performance in everyday life activities.
  • ·         Prevention of barriers to performance, including disability prevention.

Evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

  • ·         Client factors, including body functions (such as neuromuscular, sensory, visual, perceptual, cognitive) and body structures (such as cardiovascular, digestive, integumentary, genitourinary systems).
  • ·         Habits, routines, roles and behavior patterns.
  • ·         Cultural, physical, environmental, social, and spiritual contexts and activity demands that affect performance.
  • ·         Performance skills, including motor, process, and communication/interaction skills.

Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), education, work, play, leisure, and social participation, including:

    • Therapeutic use of occupations, exercises, and activities.
    • Training in self-care, self-management, home management and community/work reintegration.
    • Development, remediation, or compensation of physical, cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory functions and behavioral skills.
    • Therapeutic use of self, including one's personality, insights, perceptions, and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process.
    • Education and training of individuals, including family members, caregivers, and others.
    • Care coordination, case management and transition services.
    • Consultative services to groups, programs, organizations, or communities.
    • Modification of environments (home, work, school, or community) and adaptation of processes, including the application of ergonomic principles.
    • Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting and training in assistive technology, adaptive devices, and orthotic devices, and training in the use of prosthetic devices.
    • Assessment, recommendation, and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility including wheelchair management.
    • Driver rehabilitation and community mobility.
    • Management of feeding, eating, and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance.
    • Application of physical agent modalities, and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures (such as wound care management; techniques to enhance sensory, perceptual, and cognitive processing; manual therapy techniques) to enhance performance skills.

Tex. Occ. §362.1

Utah

"Practice of occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of everyday life activities with an individual:

    • That has or is at risk of developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation, or participation restriction; and
    • To develop or restore the individual's ability to engage in everyday life activities by addressing physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory, or other aspects of the individual's performance.

"Practice of occupational therapy" includes:

  • Establishing, remediating, or restoring an undeveloped or impaired skill or ability of an individual;
  • Modifying or adapting an activity or environment to enhance an individual's performance;
  • Maintaining and improving an individual's capabilities to avoid declining performance in everyday life activities;
  • Promoting health and wellness to develop or improve an individual's performance in everyday life activities;
  • Performance-barrier prevention for an individual, including disability prevention;
  • Evaluating factors that affect an individual's activities of daily living in educational, work, play, leisure, and social situations, including:
    • body functions and structures;
    • habits, routines, roles, and behavioral patterns;
    • cultural, physical, environmental, social, virtual, and spiritual contexts and activity demands that affect performance; and
    • motor, process, communication, interaction, and other performance skills;
  • Providing interventions and procedures to promote or enhance an individual's safety and performance in activities of daily living in educational, work, and social situations, including:
    • the therapeutic use of occupations and exercises;
    • training in self-care, self-management, home-management, and community and work reintegration;
    • the development, remediation, or compensation of behavioral skills and physical, cognitive, neuromuscular, and sensory functions;
    • the education and training of an individual's family members and caregivers;
    • care coordination, case management, and transition services;
    •  providing consulting services to groups, programs, organizations, or communities,
    • modifying the environment and adapting processes, including the application of ergonomic principles;
    • assessing, designing, fabricating, applying, fitting, and providing training in assistive technology, adaptive devices, orthotic devices, and prosthetic devices;
    • assessing, recommending, and training an individual in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including wheelchair management;
    •  driver rehabilitation and community mobility;
    • enhancing eating and feeding performance; and
    • applying physical agent modalities, managing wound care, and using manual therapy techniques to enhance an individual's performance skills, if the occupational therapist has received the necessary training as determined by division rule in collaboration with the board.

Utah Code § 58-42a-102

Vermont

"Occupational therapy practice" means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful occupations (goal-directed activities) to evaluate and treat individuals who have a disease or disorder, impairment, activity limitation, or participation restriction that interferes with their ability to function independently in daily life roles, and to promote health and wellness. Occupational therapy intervention may include:

    • Remediation or restoration of performance abilities that are limited due to impairment in biological, physiological, psychological, or neurological processes;
    •  Adaptation of task, process, or the environment, or the teaching of compensatory techniques, in order to enhance performance;
    • Disability prevention methods and techniques that facilitate the development of safe application of performance skills;
    • Health promotion strategies and practices that enhance performance abilities.

"Occupational therapy services" include:

    • Evaluating, developing, improving, sustaining, or restoring skills in activities of daily living, work, or productive activities, including instrumental activities of daily living, and play and leisure activities;
    • Evaluating, developing, remediating, or restoring sensorimotor, cognitive, or psychosocial components of performance;
    • Designing, fabricating, applying, or training in the use of assistive technology or orthotic devices, and training in the use of prosthetic devices;
    • Adaptation of environments and processes, including the application of ergonomic principles, to enhance performance and safety in daily life roles;
    • Application of physical agent modalities as an adjunct to or in preparation for engagement in occupations;
    • Evaluating and providing intervention in collaboration with the individual receiving treatment, family, caregiver, or others;
    •  Educating the individual receiving treatment, family, caregiver, or others in carrying out appropriate nonskilled interventions; and
    • Consulting with groups, programs, organizations, or communities to provide population-based services

26 V.S.A. § 3351

Virginia

"Practice of occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of occupations for habilitation and rehabilitation to enhance physical health, mental health, and cognitive functioning and includes the evaluation, analysis, assessment, and delivery of education and training in basic and instrumental activities of daily living; the design, fabrication, and application of orthoses (splints); the design, selection, and use of adaptive equipment and assistive technologies; therapeutic activities to enhance functional performance; vocational evaluation and training; and consultation concerning the adaptation of physical, sensory, and social environments.

Va. Code. Ann. § 54.1-2900

Washington

"Occupational therapy" is the scientifically based use of purposeful activity with individuals who are limited by physical injury or illness, psychosocial dysfunction, developmental or learning disabilities, or the aging process in order to maximize independence, prevent disability, and maintain health. The practice encompasses evaluation, treatment, and consultation. Specific occupational therapy services include but are not limited to: Using specifically designed activities and exercises to enhance neurodevelopmental, cognitive, perceptual motor, sensory integrative, and psychomotor functioning; administering and interpreting tests such as manual muscle and sensory integration; teaching daily living skills; developing prevocational skills and play and avocational capabilities; designing, fabricating, or applying selected orthotic and prosthetic devices or selected adaptive equipment; wound care management as provided in RCW 18.59.170; and adapting environments for persons with disabilities. These services are provided individually, in groups, or through social systems.

RCW 18.59.020

West Virginia

The scope of practice of occupational therapy includes, but is not limited to:

Methods or strategies selected to direct the process of interventions such as:

    • Establishment, remediation, or restoration of a skill or ability that has not yet developed or is impaired;
    •  Compensation, modification, or adaptation of activity or environment to enhance performance;
    • Maintenance and enhancement of capabilities without which performance in everyday life activities would decline;
    • Health promotion and wellness to enable or enhance performance in everyday life activities; and
    • Prevention of barriers to performance, including disability prevention.

 Evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), education, work, play, leisure and social participation, including:

    • Client factors, including body functions and body structures;
    • Habits, routines, roles and behavior patterns;
    • Cultural, physical, environmental, social and spiritual contexts and activity that affect performance; and
    • Performance skills, including motor, process and communication/interaction skills.

Interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living (ADL), instrumental activities of daily living (IADL), education, work, play, leisure and social participation, including:

    • Therapeutic use of occupations and preparatory, adjunctive and functional activities;
    • Training in self-care, self-management home management and community/work reintegration;
    •  Development, remediation, or compensation of physical, cognitive, neuromuscular, sensory functions, visual, vestibular and behavioral skills;
    • Therapeutic use of self, including one's personality, insights, perceptions and judgments, as part of the therapeutic process;
    • Education and training of individuals, including family members, care givers and others;
    • Care coordination, case management and transition services;
    • Consultative services to groups, programs, organizations or communities;
    • Modification of environments (home, work, school or community) and adaptation of processes, including the application of ergonomic principles;
    • Assessment, design, fabrication, application, fitting and training in assistive technology, adaptive devices, orthotic devices and training in the use of prosthetic devices to enhance occupational performance;
    • Assessment, recommendation and training in techniques to enhance functional mobility, including wheelchair management;
    • Community mobility and re-entry;
    • Management of feeding, eating and swallowing to enable eating and feeding performance; and
    •  Application of physical agent modalities and use of a range of specific therapeutic procedures and techniques to enhance occupational performance skills. Use of physical agent modalities by occupational therapy assistants must be consistent with their education (e.g. superficial thermal and mechanical modalities) and used under the general supervision of an occupational therapist. The use of deep thermal or electrical modalities may only be performed by the occupational therapy assistant under the direct supervision of an occupational therapist, until the board shall promulgate rules as well as establish competency standards for the use of the modalities.

W. Va. Code §30-28-4

Wisconsin

“Occupational therapy" means the therapeutic use of purposeful and meaningful occupations to evaluate and treat individuals of all ages who have a disease, disorder, impairment, activity limitation or participation restriction that interferes with their ability to function independently in daily life roles and environments and to promote health and wellness.

Wis. Stats. § 448.96

Wyoming

"Occupational therapy" means: The therapeutic use of occupations including everyday life activities with individuals, groups, populations

or organizations to support participation, performance and function in roles and situations in home, school, workplace, community and other settings;

The provision of services for habilitation, rehabilitation and the promotion of health and wellness to those who have or are at risk for developing an illness, injury, disease, disorder, condition, impairment, disability, activity limitation or participation restriction;

Addressing the physical, cognitive, psychosocial, sensory-perceptual and other aspects of performance in a variety of contexts and environments to support engagement in occupations, contexts and environments that affect physical and mental health, well-being and quality of life;

Performing the tasks of occupational therapy through personal interaction or appropriate use of telecommunication services and other communication technologies;

Performing the tasks of an occupational therapist or occupational therapy assistant commensurate with his education, training and experience;

    • The practice of occupational therapy which includes:
    • The evaluation of factors affecting activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure and social participation;
    • The use of methods or approaches to direct the process of interventions; and
    • The use of interventions and procedures to promote or enhance safety and performance in activities of daily living, instrumental activities of daily living, rest and sleep, education, work, play, leisure and social participation.

Wyo. Stat. Ann. 3-40-102


Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software