Upcoming Webinars 

Disclaimer

The analysis of any legal or medical billing is dependent on numerous specific facts — including the factual situations present related to the patients, the practice, the professionals and the medical services and advice. Additionally, laws and regulations and insurance and payer policies are subject to change. The information that has been accurate previously can be particularly dependent on changes in time or circumstances. The information contained in this web site is intended as general information only. It is not intended to serve as medical, health, legal or financial advice or as a substitute for professional advice of a medical coding professional, healthcare consultant, physician or medical professional, legal counsel, accountant or financial advisor. If you have a question about a specific matter, you should contact a professional advisor directly. CPT copyright American Medical Association. All rights reserved. CPT is a registered trademark of the American Medical Association.

Menu
Log in


Log in

Protected Health Information

Protected Health Information

The Privacy Rule protects all "individually identifiable health information" held or transmitted by a covered entity or its business associate, in any form or media, whether electronic, paper, or oral. The Privacy Rule calls this information "protected health information (PHI)."

“Individually identifiable health information” is information, including demographic data, that relates to:

    • The individual’s past, present or future physical or mental health or condition,
    • The provision of health care to the individual, or
    • The past, present, or future payment for the provision of health care to the individual, and
    • That identifies the individual or for which there is a reasonable basis to believe can be used to identify the individual.

Individually identifiable health information includes many common identifiers (e.g., name, address, birth date, Social Security Number).

De-Identified Health Information

There are no restrictions on the use or disclosure of de-identified health information.  De-identified health information neither identifies nor provides a reasonable basis to identify an individual. There are two ways to de-identify information; either:

    • A formal determination by a qualified statistician; or
    • The removal of specified identifiers of the individual and of the individual’s relatives, household members, and employers is required, and is adequate only if the covered entity has no actual knowledge that the remaining information could be used to identify the individual.

Reference

45 C.F.R. ยง 160.103

Powered by Wild Apricot Membership Software